WordPress is a great CMS for designers who want to build websites quickly and with minimal fuss. WordPress templates are also great for designers, allowing them to focus on creating beautiful websites instead of spending time on code. However, it’s not the perfect solution for every designer. If you’re comfortable with code, have a particular design aesthetic, or simply want to be more involved in the site-building process, then perhaps you should avoid WordPress as a designer. But if you’re happy with a CMS that does most of the heavy lifting for you, then read on to see if wordpress development companies are right for you as a designer.

Why is WordPress Good for Designers?

WordPress is a great CMS for designers because it’s easy to use, has a massive selection of themes, and has a thriving community. Using WordPress for your website means you don’t need to worry about hiring a developer or finding a hosting provider. Plus, designers can easily create beautiful websites with WordPress because it comes with a selection of easy-to-customise themes.

Simply find the theme that best suits your design aesthetic, then edit it to fit your needs. The biggest reason designers love using WordPress is because of the community. WordPress has a huge online support network where you can learn more about using the CMS and find help with any issues you run into. There are also many online communities where designers can connect and exchange ideas.

Drawbacks of using WordPress as a designer

WordPress is an excellent CMS that allows designers to easily create websites without needing to know much code. But because it’s so easy to use, it might also be easy to fall into a rut and not push yourself beyond your comfort zone. If you use WordPress exclusively, you might become a bit lazy and rely on creating the same types of websites over and over again.

This can be especially true if you use a theme that’s similar to previous websites you’ve made. However, WordPress can also help you expand as a designer. Once you become familiar with the CMS, you can try out different types of projects and stretch yourself beyond your normal comfort zone. You just need to be willing to step out of your comfort zone and challenge yourself.

Should you use WordPress as a designer?

Before you decide to use WordPress as a designer, it’s important to understand exactly what using WordPress entails. If you decide to go with a WordPress template, you’ll be taking advantage of someone else’s design. But this can be a good thing. Using a WordPress template can help you create a website quickly, which is especially useful if you’re designing websites for clients. Plus, there are thousands of templates available online, so it’s easy to find one that suits your design aesthetic.

If you decide to code your website from scratch using WordPress, the process will take a bit longer. Designers who choose to code their websites should be familiar with basic design principles and have a basic understanding of how WordPress works. You don’t need to be an expert, but you should be able to follow a basic tutorial and understand the fundamentals of how WordPress works.

The Dark Side of Using WordPress as a Designer

While there are many reasons designers love using WordPress, there are also some potential drawbacks, such as security issues and bloat. Unfortunately, WordPress websites are often targeted by hackers due to the large number of them online and the fact that many users don’t take security seriously.

If you use WordPress and don’t take proper security measures, you might end up with a hacked website. Another potential problem is bloat, which occurs when a website’s code becomes too large and is difficult to maintain. This can be especially problematic if you code your website from scratch. However, it can also happen when you use WordPress. The best way to avoid bloat is to keep your website’s code clean and organised.

Conclusion

Designers love using WordPress because it’s easy to use and has a massive selection of themes. However, it’s not the perfect solution for every designer. If you’re comfortable with code, have a particular design aesthetic, or simply want to be more involved in the site-building process, then perhaps you should avoid WordPress as a designer. But if you’re happy with a CMS that does most of the heavy lifting for you, then read on to see if WordPress is right for you as a designer.

 

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